The iliad book one

The men argue, and Achilles threatens to withdraw from battle and take his people, the Myrmidons, back home to Phthia. They cut out the thigh-bones, wrapped them round in two layers of fat, set some pieces of raw meat on the top of them, and then Chryses laid them on the wood fire and poured wine over them, while the young men stood near him with five-pronged spits in their hands.

Just as once before when I prayed to you, you honoured me and struck the Achaeans a fierce blow, so grant my new plea, and avert this dreadful scourge from the Danaans.

And Ulysses went as captain. When they arrive, Achilles welcomes them and lets the heralds take Briseis away without a fight. They found Achilles sitting by his tent and his ships, and ill-pleased he was when he beheld them.

Agamemnon refuses, saying that he will take the prize of any captain he pleases, including Achilles. But now my heart fears silver-footed Thetis, daughter of the Old Man of the Sea, has swayed you; for she knelt by you at dawn and clasped your knees. Surely I would be called cowardly and of no account, if I am to yield to you in every matter that you say.

No horse or cow of mine have they stolen, nor have my crops been ravaged in deep-soiled Phthianurturer of men, since the shadowy mountains and the echoing sea lie between us. You forget this, and threaten to rob me of the prize for which I have toiled, and which the sons of the Achaeans have given me.

This is not well; for you behold, all of you, that my prize is to go elsewhither. No horse or cow of mine have they stolen, nor have my crops been ravaged in deep-soiled Phthianurturer of men, since the shadowy mountains and the echoing sea lie between us.

Achilles is seized by rage and thinks of killing Agamemnon on the spot, but the goddess Athena appears at his side and checks his anger, promising him a reward for his restraint. Her, I shall not free; old age will claim her first, far from her own country, in Argosmy home, where she can tend the loom, and share my bed.

I came not warring here for any ill the Trojans had done me. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them, that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home.

What joy in a good banquet if animosity prevails? The gods laugh and feast. I swear, on this, a solemn oath to you, that a day will surely come when the Achaeans, one and all, shall long for Achilles, a day when you, despite your grief, are powerless to help them, as they fall in swathes at the hands of man-killing Hector.

What is it that grieves you? Of all the god-beloved princes here you are most odious to me, since war, contention, strife are dear to you. Juno has sent me, who cares for both of you alike. But this man wants to rule over others; to lord it, be king of all, and issue orders, though I know one who will flout him.

No one of the others saw her. She agrees to go see Zeus when he returns to Olympus in twelve days, and instructs Achilles to keep clear of the fighting. These were the mightiest men ever born upon this earth: When Hera does indeed become annoyed, Zeus is able to silence her only by threatening to strangle her.

They have not raided my cattle nor my horses, nor cut down my harvests on the rich plains of Phthia; for between me and them there is a great space, both mountain and sounding sea. Why, you shameless schemer, why should any Achaean leap to obey your orders to march or wage war?

But this man wants to rule over others; to lord it, be king of all, and issue orders, though I know one who will flout him. Similarly, his hesitation in making this promise stems not from some worthy desire to let fate play itself out but from his fear of annoying his wife.

Truly he rages with baneful mind, and knows not at all to look both before and after, that his Achaeans might wage war in safety beside their ships.

All the immortal gods there were troubled, and it was Hephaestusfamed for his skill, who broke the silence, hoping to calm his mother, white-armed Hera: Come, try, and let these men be witness: Whatever it is right for you to hear, no immortal, no human, shall know before you; but of what I plan without reference to the gods, make no question, do not ask.

Now Chryses had come to the ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, and had brought with him a great ransom: And which of the gods was it that set them on to quarrel?

So they came to the broad camp of the Achaeans, dragged the black vessel high on shore, and propped her with lengths of timber, then dispersed among the huts and ships. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire.

Ten days later Achilles calls a meeting of the troops. Juno has sent me, who cares for both of you alike.The Iliad by Homer, part of the Internet Classics Archive.

Homer: The Iliad

Home: Browse and Comment: Search: Buy Books and CD-ROMs Book I Sing, O goddess of Jove fulfilled from the day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles, first fell out with one another. And which of the gods was it that set them on to quarrel?

A summary of Book 1 in Homer's The Iliad. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Iliad and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and. The Iliad starts in the tenth year of the war. The point is, now that you know what the "things" are, it's high time we jumped "into the middle of" them!

The first scene of the Iliad finds Chryses, the priest of Apollo (god of the sun and a whole lot of other stuff), approaching the Achaian camp to. Classical Texts Library >> Homer, Iliad >> Book 1 HOMER, ILIAD 1 HOMER was a semi-legendary Greek poet from Ionia who the Greeks ascribed with the composition of their greatest epics-- The Iliad and The Odyssey.

Homer's Iliad Books Provided by The Internet Classics Archive. See bottom for copyright. Available online at know that I shall offend one who rules the Argives with might, to whom all the Achaeans are in subjection.

Homer: The Iliad

A plain man cannot stand against the anger of a king, who if he. A summary of Book 1 in Homer's The Iliad. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Iliad and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Download
The iliad book one
Rated 4/5 based on 17 review